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Others weren’t so impressed: “Any performance skills you have go out the window,” complained comedian Jay Leno in a 1995 Now, some twenty years later, the once-vibrant chatroom communities of AOL have nearly disappeared, but they are still there … About 1,500 people can be counted in all of AOL’s public chatrooms today, a number that in the ‘90s wouldn’t have even matched a large “auditorium”-style room where celebrities would hold court.Today, many chatrooms seem to have only one person loitering inside.We went through each email, and tagged it either "Telstra", "Optus", "Vodafone", "Other" or "Unknown/not mentioned".Telstra was the most complained about, Optus second. Many people were horrified the practice of third-party billing was legal.We contacted all three telcos but received no real explanation for how they are going to ensure consumers are not erroneously subscribed in the future, beyond offering the ability to opt-out of premium content services.As for why opt-out "STOP" messages were often ignored, the telcos say they require providers to comply and will investigate them if they do not.It’s incredibly difficult to even use the chatrooms, because you need AOL Desktop, a free program that when downloaded, feels like a glimpse back into the days of dial-up. And, just like in the 1990s, people looking for sex. She’s 72, and in her free time, she likes making miniature scenes and working in her garden.Now primarily a digital media company, AOL — it owns about them: the company refused to make anyone available for this story. But when she has about an hour, she’ll log on to chat.

Robyn told us her teenager had also been signed up to a premium service without her consent, and that her telco, Optus, denied responsibility."I've spent ages on Optus chat trying to get it resolved and removed from my bill," she said."'You have to pay anyway and someone will contact you eventually'."Hugh wrote in to say his five-year-old, while playing a mobile game, managed to sign the account holder up to a premium service."I had no idea such a thing was even possible," he said."While the basic principle of frictionless transactions makes a bit of sense, when it is employed for such low-end, scammy rubbish it indicates Telstra really just care about the dollars."So many.

When he heard the sound of a door creeping open ring from the speakers of his desktop computer, he’d perk up because the sound meant a friend was online, and they were free to chat.

That was the 1990s, and Riccardi was into grunge and metal music, video games, and computers.

Amazingly, no-one knew how they had been subscribed.

No-one knew where they could find the so-called "premium content" they were paying for.

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